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Luxembourg

  • Monarch:Henri
  • Prime Minister:Xavier Bettel
  • Capital city:Luxembourg
  • Languages:Luxembourgish (official administrative and judicial language and national language (spoken vernacular)) 88.8%, French (official administrative, judicial, and legislative language) 4.2%, Portuguese 2.3%, German (official administrative and judicial language) 1.1%, other 3.5% (2011 est.)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:6,07,728 (2018)
  • Area, sq km:2,430
  • GDP per capita, US$:1,14,340 (2018)
  • GDP, billion current US$:69.5 (2018)
  • GINI index:No data
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:66

science

All datasets:  A B C D E F G H I J K M N O P R S T U V
  • A
    • सितम्बर 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 नवम्बर, 2015
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      The data in this domain is collected by Eurostat in close cooperation with DG MARKT in the context of the annual "EU Postal Survey" (voluntary data collection). The partners in the data collection are the National Regulatory Authorities (NRAs) in the participating countries. The list of indicators/questionnaires and the definitions (Glossary) were agreed in cooperation with the European Postal Regulators in the project group "Assistance and development of EU statistics" of the European Committee for Postal Regulation (CERP). The data presented cover the companies operating under the Universal Service obligation (Universal Service Providers - USP). For countries where a USP no longer exists, the company which was the USP prior to liberalisation is referred to. "Universal service" refers here to the set of general interest demands to which services such as the mail should be subject throughout the Community.  The collection of 'Postal Services' includes data on employment, turnover, access points, traffic, prices and quality of service.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created, named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 जुलाई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected annually by the National Statistical Institutes and are based on Eurostat's annual model questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage in households and by individuals. The model questionnaire changes every year. The changes of questions in the MQ are required by the evolving situation of information and communication technologies. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society  2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. ICT usage data are also used in the Consumer Conditions Scoreboard (purchases over the Internet) and in the Employment Guidelines (e-skills of individuals). The aim of the European ICT surveys is the timely provision of statistics on individuals and households on the use of Information and Communication Technologies at European level. Data for this collection are supplied directly from the surveys with no separate treatment. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: access to and use of ICTs by individuals and/or in households,use of the Internet and other electronic networks for different purposes by individuals and/or in households,ICT security and trust,ICT competence and skills,barriers to the use of ICT and the Internet,perceived effects of ICT usage on individuals and/or on households,use of ICT by individuals to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),access to and use of technologies enabling connection to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns (see details of available breakdowns): Relating to households: by region of residence (NUTS 1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area) by type of householdby households net monthly income (optional) Relating to individuals: by region of residence (NUTS1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation: (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area)by genderby country of birth, country of citizenship (as of 2010, optional in 2010)by educational level: ISCED 1997 up to 2013 and ISCED 2011 from 2014 onwards.by occupation: manual, non-manual; ICT (coded by 2-digit ISCO categories)/non-ICT (optional: all 2-digit ISCO categories)by employment situationby age (in completed years and by groups)legal / de facto marital status (2011-2014, optional) Regional breakdowns (NUTS) are available only for a selection of indicators disseminated in the regional tables in Eurobase (Regional Information society statistics by NUTS regions (isoc_reg): Households with access to the internet at homeHouseholds with broadband accessIndividuals who have never used a computerIndividuals who used the internet, frequency of use and activitiesIndividuals who used the internet for interaction with public authoritiesIndividuals who ordered goods or services over the internet for private useIndividuals who accessed the internet away from home or work
  • B
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मई, 2019
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      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अप्रैल 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 मई, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • अप्रैल 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 मई, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB), Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created, named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
  • C
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • दिसम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • दिसम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • जून 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 जून, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • जून 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 जून, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • दिसम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the "identity" of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • जुलाई 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 जुलाई, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications / granted to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications / granted to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.
    • जुलाई 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 जुलाई, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जुलाई 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 जुलाई, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications / granted to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications / granted to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.
    • जुलाई 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 जुलाई, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
  • D
    • अक्तूबर 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 नवम्बर, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
  • E
    • जुलाई 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 दिसम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created, named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created, named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created, named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • फरवरी 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अक्तूबर 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 दिसम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:htec_emp_sbs2 Data description 'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under 21.3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under 21.3. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under 21.3. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under 21.3. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association (EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 मई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • दिसम्बर 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 दिसम्बर, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • जनवरी 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis7_type The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • मई 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 मई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • जून 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • जून 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • दिसम्बर 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 दिसम्बर, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
  • F
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 जुलाई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected annually by the National Statistical Institutes and are based on Eurostat's annual model questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage in households and by individuals. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society  2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. ICT usage data are also used in the Consumer Conditions Scoreboard (purchases over the Internet) and in the Employment Guidelines (e-skills of individuals). The aim of the European ICT surveys is the timely provision of statistics on individuals and households on the use of Information and Communication Technologies at European level. Data for this collection are supplied directly from the surveys with no separate treatment. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects:access to and use of ICTs by individuals and/or in households,use of the Internet and other electronic networks for different purposes by individuals and/or in households,ICT security and trust,ICT competence and skills,barriers to the use of ICT and the Internet,perceived effects of ICT usage on individuals and/or on households,use of ICT by individuals to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),access to and use of technologies enabling connection to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns (see details of available breakdowns): Relating to households:by region of residence (NUTS 1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area) by type of householdby households net monthly income (optional) Relating to individuals:by region of residence (NUTS1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation: (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area)by genderby country of birth, country of citizenship (as of 2010, optional in 2010)by educational level: ISCED 1997 up to 2013 and ISCED 2011 from 2014 onwards.by occupation: manual, non-manual; ICT (coded by 2-digit ISCO categories)/non-ICT (optional: all 2-digit ISCO categories)by employment situationby age (in completed years and by groups)legal / de facto marital status (2011-2014, optional) Regional breakdowns (NUTS) are available only for a selection of indicators disseminated in the regional tables in Eurobase (Regional Information society statistics by NUTS regions (isoc_reg):Households with access to the internet at homeHouseholds with broadband accessIndividuals who have never used a computerIndividuals who used the internet, frequency of use and activitiesIndividuals who used the internet for interaction with public authoritiesIndividuals who ordered goods or services over the internet for private useIndividuals who accessed the internet away from home or work
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
  • G
    • नवम्बर 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis7_gen The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • दिसम्बर 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 दिसम्बर, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • जनवरी 2018
      Source: National Science Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 फरवरी, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Courtesy: National Science Foundation   1. R & D stands for Research, Development and Demonstration 2. Clean energy and other non-fossil fuel technologies include renewable (solar, wind, bio fuels, ocean energy, and hydro power), nuclear, hydrogen and fuel cells, CO2 capture and storage, other power and storage, and energy efficiency    
    • दिसम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Gross domestic expenditure on R&D (GERD): Total gross domestic expenditure on research and experimental development (GERD) as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP).
  • H
    • मार्च 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • नवम्बर 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis6_mkobj The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • नवम्बर 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis6_orobj The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • नवम्बर 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis7_sou The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • अप्रैल 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 मई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created, named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अप्रैल 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 मई, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • अप्रैल 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 मई, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अप्रैल 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 मई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
  • I
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • अप्रैल 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 मई, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The objective of these data is to support the growing awareness of policy-makers of the importance of ICT specialists in the economic and social transformations related to digitisation. Eurostat works towards this objective by providing reliable official estimates based on a well-grounded and internationally agreed conceptual framework. A wide range of the EU policy initiatives have demonstrated a need for ICT specialists statistics, with the Agenda for New Skills and Jobs (2010), the Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs (2013) and the EU Skills Panorama (2014) being among the most cited ones. Moreover, the recently updated Digital Single Market strategy accentuates the need for policies aimed at boosting stability in the European labour markets and enhancing the EU competitive position; in this context, monitoring of the ICT specialists' employment gains in importance. ICT specialists' data are constructed using the secondary statistical analysis. This approach has a virtue of ensuring cost-efficient and high-quality data production. At the same time, this approach has limited options for designing new indicators, as well as for control over data quality and over data release timing. The ICT specialists' indicator and its breakdowns are based on the microdata from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). For this reason, LFS reference metadata needs to be consulted for all questions related to the underlying primary source data (see Related Metadata section). The ICT specialists data is conceptually in accordance with the data collected in the special module on ICT specialists and skills in the survey ICT usage and e-commerce in enterprises (see Related Metadata Section and Annexes for more information), i.e. it operates with the same definition of ICT specialists (see Section 3.4). Representation ICT specialists statistics contains four indicators updated on an annual basis: (1) ICT specialists, total (2) ICT specialists by gender (3) ICT specialists by level of education (4) ICT specialists by age Each indicator is presented in the country/year dimensions and is measured in absolute (1000s) and relative (%) terms. Time coverage Data covers all years starting from 2004 until the latest year available. Following the release practice of the EU LFS, the publication year is calculated as (t+1), with t being the reference year. Data for the indicators (1)-(4) are updated yearly from 2004 until the latest year available (as opposed to simply adding one additional year) to incorporate the latest revisions made in the source data, the EU LFS.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The objective of these data is to support the growing awareness of policy-makers of the importance of ICT specialists in the economic and social transformations related to digitisation. Eurostat works towards this objective by providing reliable official estimates based on a well-grounded and internationally agreed conceptual framework. A wide range of the EU policy initiatives have demonstrated a need for ICT specialists statistics, with the Agenda for New Skills and Jobs (2010), the Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs (2013) and the EU Skills Panorama (2014) being among the most cited ones. Moreover, the recently updated Digital Single Market strategy accentuates the need for policies aimed at boosting stability in the European labour markets and enhancing the EU competitive position; in this context, monitoring of the ICT specialists' employment gains in importance. ICT specialists' data are constructed using the secondary statistical analysis. This approach has a virtue of ensuring cost-efficient and high-quality data production. At the same time, this approach has limited options for designing new indicators, as well as for control over data quality and over data release timing. The ICT specialists' indicator and its breakdowns are based on the microdata from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). For this reason, LFS reference metadata needs to be consulted for all questions related to the underlying primary source data (see Related Metadata section). The ICT specialists data is conceptually in accordance with the data collected in the special module on ICT specialists and skills in the survey ICT usage and e-commerce in enterprises (see Related Metadata Section and Annexes for more information), i.e. it operates with the same definition of ICT specialists (see Section 3.4). Representation ICT specialists statistics contains four indicators updated on an annual basis: (1) ICT specialists, total (2) ICT specialists by gender (3) ICT specialists by level of education (4) ICT specialists by age Each indicator is presented in the country/year dimensions and is measured in absolute (1000s) and relative (%) terms. Time coverage Data covers all years starting from 2004 until the latest year available. Following the release practice of the EU LFS, the publication year is calculated as (t+1), with t being the reference year. Data for the indicators (1)-(4) are updated yearly from 2004 until the latest year available (as opposed to simply adding one additional year) to incorporate the latest revisions made in the source data, the EU LFS.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The objective of these data is to support the growing awareness of policy-makers of the importance of ICT specialists in the economic and social transformations related to digitisation. Eurostat works towards this objective by providing reliable official estimates based on a well-grounded and internationally agreed conceptual framework. A wide range of the EU policy initiatives have demonstrated a need for ICT specialists statistics, with the Agenda for New Skills and Jobs (2010), the Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs (2013) and the EU Skills Panorama (2014) being among the most cited ones. Moreover, the recently updated Digital Single Market strategy accentuates the need for policies aimed at boosting stability in the European labour markets and enhancing the EU competitive position; in this context, monitoring of the ICT specialists' employment gains in importance. ICT specialists' data are constructed using the secondary statistical analysis. This approach has a virtue of ensuring cost-efficient and high-quality data production. At the same time, this approach has limited options for designing new indicators, as well as for control over data quality and over data release timing. The ICT specialists' indicator and its breakdowns are based on the microdata from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). For this reason, LFS reference metadata needs to be consulted for all questions related to the underlying primary source data (see Related Metadata section). The ICT specialists data is conceptually in accordance with the data collected in the special module on ICT specialists and skills in the survey ICT usage and e-commerce in enterprises (see Related Metadata Section and Annexes for more information), i.e. it operates with the same definition of ICT specialists (see Section 3.4). Representation ICT specialists statistics contains four indicators updated on an annual basis: (1) ICT specialists, total (2) ICT specialists by gender (3) ICT specialists by level of education (4) ICT specialists by age Each indicator is presented in the country/year dimensions and is measured in absolute (1000s) and relative (%) terms. Time coverage Data covers all years starting from 2004 until the latest year available. Following the release practice of the EU LFS, the publication year is calculated as (t+1), with t being the reference year. Data for the indicators (1)-(4) are updated yearly from 2004 until the latest year available (as opposed to simply adding one additional year) to incorporate the latest revisions made in the source data, the EU LFS.
    • जून 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • नवम्बर 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis6_mktype The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • नवम्बर 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis6_ortype The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • दिसम्बर 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 दिसम्बर, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • अगस्त 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 सितम्बर, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 जुलाई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected annually by the National Statistical Institutes and are based on Eurostat's annual model questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage in households and by individuals. The model questionnaire changes every year. The changes of questions in the MQ are required by the evolving situation of information and communication technologies. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society  2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. ICT usage data are also used in the Consumer Conditions Scoreboard (purchases over the Internet) and in the Employment Guidelines (e-skills of individuals). The aim of the European ICT surveys is the timely provision of statistics on individuals and households on the use of Information and Communication Technologies at European level. Data for this collection are supplied directly from the surveys with no separate treatment. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: access to and use of ICTs by individuals and/or in households,use of the Internet and other electronic networks for different purposes by individuals and/or in households,ICT security and trust,ICT competence and skills,barriers to the use of ICT and the Internet,perceived effects of ICT usage on individuals and/or on households,use of ICT by individuals to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),access to and use of technologies enabling connection to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns (see details of available breakdowns): Relating to households: by region of residence (NUTS 1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area) by type of householdby households net monthly income (optional) Relating to individuals: by region of residence (NUTS1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation: (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area)by genderby country of birth, country of citizenship (as of 2010, optional in 2010)by educational level: ISCED 1997 up to 2013 and ISCED 2011 from 2014 onwards.by occupation: manual, non-manual; ICT (coded by 2-digit ISCO categories)/non-ICT (optional: all 2-digit ISCO categories)by employment situationby age (in completed years and by groups)legal / de facto marital status (2011-2014, optional) Regional breakdowns (NUTS) are available only for a selection of indicators disseminated in the regional tables in Eurobase (Regional Information society statistics by NUTS regions (isoc_reg): Households with access to the internet at homeHouseholds with broadband accessIndividuals who have never used a computerIndividuals who used the internet, frequency of use and activitiesIndividuals who used the internet for interaction with public authoritiesIndividuals who ordered goods or services over the internet for private useIndividuals who accessed the internet away from home or work
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 जुलाई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected annually by the National Statistical Institutes and are based on Eurostat's annual model questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage in households and by individuals. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society  2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. ICT usage data are also used in the Consumer Conditions Scoreboard (purchases over the Internet) and in the Employment Guidelines (e-skills of individuals). The aim of the European ICT surveys is the timely provision of statistics on individuals and households on the use of Information and Communication Technologies at European level. Data for this collection are supplied directly from the surveys with no separate treatment. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects:access to and use of ICTs by individuals and/or in households,use of the Internet and other electronic networks for different purposes by individuals and/or in households,ICT security and trust,ICT competence and skills,barriers to the use of ICT and the Internet,perceived effects of ICT usage on individuals and/or on households,use of ICT by individuals to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),access to and use of technologies enabling connection to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns (see details of available breakdowns): Relating to households:by region of residence (NUTS 1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area) by type of householdby households net monthly income (optional) Relating to individuals:by region of residence (NUTS1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation: (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area)by genderby country of birth, country of citizenship (as of 2010, optional in 2010)by educational level: ISCED 1997 up to 2013 and ISCED 2011 from 2014 onwards.by occupation: manual, non-manual; ICT (coded by 2-digit ISCO categories)/non-ICT (optional: all 2-digit ISCO categories)by employment situationby age (in completed years and by groups)legal / de facto marital status (2011-2014, optional) Regional breakdowns (NUTS) are available only for a selection of indicators disseminated in the regional tables in Eurobase (Regional Information society statistics by NUTS regions (isoc_reg):Households with access to the internet at homeHouseholds with broadband accessIndividuals who have never used a computerIndividuals who used the internet, frequency of use and activitiesIndividuals who used the internet for interaction with public authoritiesIndividuals who ordered goods or services over the internet for private useIndividuals who accessed the internet away from home or work
    • जनवरी 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis7_exp The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 अप्रैल, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:htec_cis6 Data description 'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under 21.3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under 21.3. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under 21.3. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under 21.3. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association (EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • जून 2018
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 अक्तूबर, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The European Innovation Scoreboard provides a comparative analysis of innovation performance in EU countries, other European countries, and regional neighbors. It assesses relative strengths and weaknesses of national innovation systems and helps countries identify areas they need to address. The Regional Innovation Scoreboard is a regional extension of the European Innovation Scoreboard, assessing the innovation performance of European regions based on a limited number of indicators. The 2017 edition of the Scoreboard presents a refined analytical framework. Rankings are therefore not directly comparable with previous editions, but time series using the new analytical framework allow performance to be tracked over time. New indicators capture investments in skills, digital readiness, entrepreneurship, and public-private innovation partnerships. In addition, a new toolbox with contextual data can be used to analyse and compare structural differences between countries. The new scoreboard reveals that EU innovation performance continues to increase, especially due to improvements in human resources, the innovation-friendly environment, own-resource investments, and attractive research systems. Sweden remains the EU innovation leader, followed by Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, the UK, and Germany. Lithuania, Malta, the UK, the Netherlands, and Austria are the fastest growing innovators. In a global comparison, the EU is catching up with Canada and the US, but South Korea and Japan are pulling ahead. China shows the fastest progress among international competitors.
    • मई 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 मई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society 2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT security and trust,access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
  • J
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • अगस्त 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 अगस्त, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
  • K
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
  • M
    • जून 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • अक्तूबर 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 अक्तूबर, 2019
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      This biannual publication provides a set of indicators that reflect the level and structure of the efforts undertaken by OECD member countries and seven non-member economies (Argentina, People's Republic of China, Romania, Russian Federation, Singapore, South Africa, Chinese Taipei) in the field of science and technology. These data include final or provisional results as well as forecasts established by government authorities. The indicators cover the resources devoted to research and development, patent families, technology balance of payments and international trade in R&D-intensive industries. Also presented are the underlying economic series used to calculate these indicators. Indicators on R&D expenditures, budgets and personnel are derived from the OECD's Research and Development Statistics (RDS) database, which is based on the data reported to OECD and Eurostat in the framework of a co-ordinated collection. The sources for the other indicators include the OECD databases on Activities of Multinational Enterprises (AMNE), on Bilateral Trade in Goods by Industry and End-use Category database (BTDIxE), on Patents and on Technological Balance of Payments (TBP). The R&D data used in this publication have been collected and presented in line with the standard OECD methodology for R&D statistics as laid out in the OECD "Frascati Manual". The 2002 edition of the manual has now been superseded by the 2015 edition. The revised guidelines and definitions are in the course of being implemented and are not expected to change the main indicators significantly although some terminology changes will occur. This edition of MSTI has been compiled in accordance with the 2002 Frascati Manual; these changes will be made in a coming edition as R&D surveys move to the new standard.   2018 values are estimated value.
  • N
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 अक्तूबर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain provides users with data concerning Government Budget Appropriations or Outlays on R&D (GBAORD). GBAORD data are measuring government support to research and development (R&D) activities, or, in other words, how much priority Governments place on the public funding of R&D. GBAORD data are built up using the guidelines laid out in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual, OECD, 2002 . GBAORD data are broken down by:   - Socio-economic objectives (SEOs) in accordance to the Nomenclature for the analysis and comparison of scientific programmes and budgets (NABS 2007) - .   - Funding mode into: project funding and institutional funding (non-mandatory data). Part of GBAORD, which is allocated to transnational cooperation in R&D, is further broken down into three specific categories: transnational public R&D performers; Europe-wide transnational public R&D programmes and bilateral or multilateral public R&D programmes established between Member State governments or with EFTA and candidate countries. Besides in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_ HAB_KP05), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP), Percentage of total GBAORD (PC_GBA - for the breakdowns by socio-economic objectives and by funding mode), Percentage of total transnationally coordinated R&D (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by category), Percentage of government expenditure (PC_GEXP). The periodicity of the GBAORD data is annual. Data are collected corresponding to the two legally established deadlines:   - June data collection: Preliminary GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 6 months after the end of the calendar year (June). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in September.   - December data collection: Final GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 12 months after the end of the calendar year (December). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in the following February. GBAORD data are available for following countries and country groups:   - All EU Member States, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland,  Turkey, the Russian Federation, Japan, the United States and South Korea.   - Country groups: EU28 EA19.
  • O
    • फरवरी 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis7_mo The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • दिसम्बर 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 दिसम्बर, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
  • P
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जून 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जुलाई 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • अप्रैल 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 मई, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • अप्रैल 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 मई, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • मार्च 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • मार्च 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • अक्तूबर 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 नवम्बर, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जून 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जुलाई 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 नवम्बर, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • जुलाई 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis7_prod The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 मई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • नवम्बर 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2013
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:inn_cis7_pub The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 . Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • दिसम्बर 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 दिसम्बर, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
  • R
    • अक्तूबर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 अक्तूबर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The objective of these data is to provide information for benchmarking and monitoring developments in ICT sector. ICT sector statistics is used largely in the context of the Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society  2016-2021 (endorsed by the Digital Agenda High Level Group) that follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework via the Digital Agenda Scoreboard to monitor progress of the European digital economy according to the objectives set out in the Digital Agenda for Europe, a Europe 2020 Initiative. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. ICT sector indicators are compiled using the secondary statistical analysis. This approach has a virtue of ensuring cost-efficient and high-quality data collection. At the same time, this approach has limited options for designing new indicators, as well as for control over data quality and over data release timing. Data from the Structural Business Statistics (SBS), National Accounts (NA) and Research and Development (R&D) Statistics sections of the Eurostat database are used. For this reason, Metadata guidelines on SBS, on NA and on R&D Statistics are applicable to the data that has been extracted from the respective primary statistics sources. Representation ICT sector statistics contains five indicators in the country/year dimensions, which are updated on an annual basis: (1) Share of the ICT sector in GDP (2) Share of the ICT sector personnel in total employment (3) Growth of the ICT sector value added (4) Share of the ICT sector in the R&D expenditure of businesses (5) Share of the ICT sector in R&D personnel In tables (1)-(3), data for NACE economic activity codes is grouped into three aggregates:ICT sector - total,ICT manufacturingICT Services. Tables (4) and (5) report disaggregated NACE economic activities. Definition ICT sector, ICT manufacturing and ICT services are defined according to the OECD official definition (see OECD, 2011 for details). The 2002 OECD definition in terms of NACE Rev. 1.1 is used on data prior to 2009, while the 2006 OECD definition in terms of NACE Rev. 2 is applied to the data from 2009 onwards. Since the impact of the break in series related to the revision of NACE is minimised due to the compatibility between the two OECD ICT sector definitions, data for each of the indicators (1)-(3) is presented in respective single tables, and not in separate tables for each revision of NACE (as it is done in the source SBS and NA data). Data for the indicators (4) and (5) is based on the NACE Rev. 2 codes of economic activity, with the data for the years prior to 2009 being recalculated using the official correspondence tables between NACE Rev. 2 and NAVE Rev. 1.1. Time coverage Data covers all years starting from 2000 until the latest year available. Following the approach set by the source primary statistics data files, the publication year is calculated as (t+1), with t being the reference year. Data for the indicators (1)-(5) are updated yearly from 2008 until the latest year available (as opposed to simply adding one additional year) to incorporate the latest revisions made on the source data (SBS, NA and R&D statistics). Data prior to 2008 is left unchanged following the approach used in the source data domains.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • दिसम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 दिसम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
  • S
    • अक्तूबर 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 नवम्बर, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The indicator "Tertiary graduates in science and technology" includes new tertiary graduates in a calendar year from both public and private institutions completing graduate and post graduate studies compared to an age group that corresponds to the typical graduation age in most countries. It does not correspond to the number of graduates in these fields who are available in the labour market in this specific year. The levels and fields of education and training used follow the 1997 version of the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED97) and the Eurostat Manual of fields of education and training (1999).
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • अक्तूबर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 अक्तूबर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain provides users with data concerning Government Budget Appropriations or Outlays on R&D (GBAORD). GBAORD data are measuring government support to research and development (R&D) activities, or, in other words, how much priority Governments place on the public funding of R&D. GBAORD data are built up using the guidelines laid out in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual, OECD, 2002 . GBAORD data are broken down by:   - Socio-economic objectives (SEOs) in accordance to the Nomenclature for the analysis and comparison of scientific programmes and budgets (NABS 2007) - .   - Funding mode into: project funding and institutional funding (non-mandatory data). Part of GBAORD, which is allocated to transnational cooperation in R&D, is further broken down into three specific categories: transnational public R&D performers; Europe-wide transnational public R&D programmes and bilateral or multilateral public R&D programmes established between Member State governments or with EFTA and candidate countries. Besides in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_ HAB_KP05), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP), Percentage of total GBAORD (PC_GBA - for the breakdowns by socio-economic objectives and by funding mode), Percentage of total transnationally coordinated R&D (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by category), Percentage of government expenditure (PC_GEXP). The periodicity of the GBAORD data is annual. Data are collected corresponding to the two legally established deadlines:   - June data collection: Preliminary GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 6 months after the end of the calendar year (June). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in September.   - December data collection: Final GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 12 months after the end of the calendar year (December). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in the following February. GBAORD data are available for following countries and country groups:   - All EU Member States, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland,  Turkey, the Russian Federation, Japan, the United States and South Korea.   - Country groups: EU28, EU15 and EA18.
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Researchers are professionals engaged in the conception or creation of new knowledge, products, processes, methods and systems, and in the management of the projects concerned. FTE (Full-time equivalent) corresponds to one year's work by one person (for example, a person who devotes 40 % of his time to R&D) is counted as 0.4 FTE. The share of women researchers among total researchers in FTE in all sectors of performance is shown.
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Researchers are professionals engaged in the conception or creation of new knowledge, products, processes, methods and systems, and in the management of the projects concerned. The share of women researchers among total researchers in head count in all institutional sectors is shown.
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • नवम्बर 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 नवम्बर, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
  • T
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain provides users with data concerning Government Budget Appropriations or Outlays on R&D (GBAORD). GBAORD data are measuring government support to research and development (R&D) activities, or, in other words, how much priority Governments place on the public funding of R&D. GBAORD data are built up using the guidelines laid out in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual, OECD, 2002 (See annex at the bottom of the page). GBAORD data are broken down by:   - Socio-economic objectives (SEOs) in accordance to the Nomenclature for the analysis and comparison of scientific programmes and budgets (NABS 2007) - (See annex at the bottom of the page).   - Funding mode into: project funding and institutional funding (non-mandatory data). Part of GBAORD, which is allocated to transnational cooperation in R&D, is further broken down into three specific categories: transnational public R&D performers; Europe-wide transnational public R&D programmes and bilateral or multilateral public R&D programmes established between Member State governments or with EFTA and candidate countries. Besides in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_ HAB_KP05), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP), Percentage of total GBAORD (PC_GBA - for the breakdowns by socio-economic objectives and by funding mode), Percentage of total transnationally coordinated R&D (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by category), Percentage of government expenditure (PC_GEXP). The periodicity of the GBAORD data is annual. Data are collected corresponding to the two legally established deadlines:   - June data collection: Preliminary GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 6 months after the end of the calendar year (June). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in September.   - December data collection: Final GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 12 months after the end of the calendar year (December). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in the following February. GBAORD data are available for following countries and country groups:   - All EU Member States, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland,  Turkey, the Russian Federation, Japan, the United States and South Korea.   - Country groups: EU28, EU15 and EA18.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain provides users with data concerning Government Budget Appropriations or Outlays on R&D (GBAORD). GBAORD data are measuring government support to research and development (R&D) activities, or, in other words, how much priority Governments place on the public funding of R&D. GBAORD data are built up using the guidelines laid out in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual, OECD, 2002 . GBAORD data are broken down by:   - Socio-economic objectives (SEOs) in accordance to the Nomenclature for the analysis and comparison of scientific programmes and budgets (NABS 2007) - .   - Funding mode into: project funding and institutional funding (non-mandatory data). Part of GBAORD, which is allocated to transnational cooperation in R&D, is further broken down into three specific categories: transnational public R&D performers; Europe-wide transnational public R&D programmes and bilateral or multilateral public R&D programmes established between Member State governments or with EFTA and candidate countries. Besides in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_ HAB_KP05), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP), Percentage of total GBAORD (PC_GBA - for the breakdowns by socio-economic objectives and by funding mode), Percentage of total transnationally coordinated R&D (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by category), Percentage of government expenditure (PC_GEXP). The periodicity of the GBAORD data is annual. Data are collected corresponding to the two legally established deadlines:   - June data collection: Preliminary GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 6 months after the end of the calendar year (June). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in September.   - December data collection: Final GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 12 months after the end of the calendar year (December). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in the following February. GBAORD data are available for following countries and country groups:   - All EU Member States, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland,  Turkey, the Russian Federation, Japan, the United States and South Korea.   - Country groups: EU28 EA19.
    • अक्तूबर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 अक्तूबर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain provides users with data concerning Government Budget Appropriations or Outlays on R&D (GBAORD). GBAORD data are measuring government support to research and development (R&D) activities, or, in other words, how much priority Governments place on the public funding of R&D. GBAORD data are built up using the guidelines laid out in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual, OECD, 2002 (See annex at the bottom of the page). GBAORD data are broken down by:   - Socio-economic objectives (SEOs) in accordance to the Nomenclature for the analysis and comparison of scientific programmes and budgets (NABS 2007) - (See annex at the bottom of the page).   - Funding mode into: project funding and institutional funding (non-mandatory data). Part of GBAORD, which is allocated to transnational cooperation in R&D, is further broken down into three specific categories: transnational public R&D performers; Europe-wide transnational public R&D programmes and bilateral or multilateral public R&D programmes established between Member State governments or with EFTA and candidate countries. Besides in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_ HAB_KP05), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP), Percentage of total GBAORD (PC_GBA - for the breakdowns by socio-economic objectives and by funding mode), Percentage of total transnationally coordinated R&D (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by category), Percentage of government expenditure (PC_GEXP). The periodicity of the GBAORD data is annual. Data are collected corresponding to the two legally established deadlines:   - June data collection: Preliminary GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 6 months after the end of the calendar year (June). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in September.   - December data collection: Final GBAORD data are provided to Eurostat 12 months after the end of the calendar year (December). This data are targeted to be disseminated in Eurobase in the following February. GBAORD data are available for following countries and country groups:   - All EU Member States, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland,  Turkey, the Russian Federation, Japan, the United States and South Korea.   - Country groups: EU28, EU15 and EA18.
    • अप्रैल 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 मई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created, named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB), Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB), Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB), Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB), Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB), Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Researchers are professionals engaged in the conception or creation of new knowledge, products, processes, methods and systems, and in the management of the projects concerned. FTE (Full-time equivalent) corresponds to one year's work by one person (for example, a person who devotes 40 % of his time to R&D is counted as 0.4 FTE.
    • जून 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 जून, 2019
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      Researchers are professionals engaged in the conception or creation of new knowledge, products, processes, methods and systems, and in the management of the projects concerned. Head count (HC) data measure the total number of researchers who are mainly or partly employed on R&D.
    • जनवरी 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जनवरी, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 मई, 2019
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      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • U
    • जनवरी 2018
      Source: National Science Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 फरवरी, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Courtesy of the National Science Foundation
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST) domain provides data on stocks and flows (where flows in turn are divided into job-to-job mobility and education inflows). Stocks and flows are the main statistics for HRST. Their methodologies interlink and are therefore presented together in one single metadata-file. This metadata-file is duplicated in the structure of Eurostat's online database, while statistics for stocks and flows are found in separate folders. Several breakdowns are available for stocks and flows indicators: sex, age, region, sector of economic activity, occupation, educational attainment, fields of education, although not all combinations are possible. The data on stocks and job-to-job mobility are obtained from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU LFS). The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys and forwarding the results to Eurostat. The data on education inflows are obtained from Eurostat's Education database and in turn obtained via the UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat questionnaire on education. The National Statistical Institutes are responsible for conducting the surveys, compiling the results and forwarding the results to Eurostat. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • जून 2019
      Source: UNESCO Institute for Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 सितम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
  • V
    • मई 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 मई, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Venture capital is a subset of private equity and refers to equity investment made for launch (seed), early development (start-up), or expansion (later stage venture) of business developed by enterprises not quoted on the stock market. Private equity can be further used to expand working capital, to make acquisitions, to strengthen a company’s balance sheet and for buyouts. Several stages can be distinguished in the expansion, the post-venture stage of fundraising: growth, rescue/turnaround, replacement and buyouts. The Venture capital investments (VCI) indicators are compiled based on the data collected by the INVEST Europe (formerly named European Private Equity & Venture Capital Association EVCA) survey of all private equity and venture capital companies. INVEST Europe is responsible for data collection and primary data treatment. The investment statistics released by INVEST Europe are provided on the one hand by the country of the private equity firm – industry statistics, and on the other hand by the country of portfolio company – market statistics. Data on Ventures capital investments presented in Eurobase are aggregated based on industry statistics. Data on venture capital in Eurobase refer to the amount of money invested and to the number of companies that receive the investment. Until 2006 reference year Eurostat VCI data were aggregated into 3 stages following the structure of investment stages as defined by the (former) EVCA : Investment in early stage (seed + start-up)Investment in expansion and replacement stage (expansion + replacement capital)Investment for buyouts (buyouts) In 2007 reference year important changes were brought to the methodology and sample of a survey. Furthermore, new aggregates were defined to better reflect the nature of the private equity capital. In consequence starting with 2007 data, the reconstruction of the former three stages revealed impossible. Due to this important break in series new data collection including detailed financing stages was created and introduced in Eurobase accordingly to the stage of the business. These data are broken into following groups: Venture capital in seed stageVenture capital in start-up stageVenture capital in later stageTotal venture capital (investment in seed + start-up + later stage)Investment in growth stageInvestment for rescue/turnaroundInvestment for replacementInvestment for buyoutsTotal investment For a more detailed definition, see 3.4 Statistical concepts and definitions. The data cover the EU-15 Member States, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Norway and Switzerland. The indicators are presented in EUR million, as a number of investments (only for 1989-2006 period), as a number of companies involved and as a percentage of GDP (Gross domestic product at market prices), which is defined in conformity with the European System of national and regional Accounts in the Community (ESA 95). For the reasons of scale, only the Total venture capital and the Total investment are expressed as a percentage of GDP. From a year to another one, data can differ. Several factors could explain these differences, for example: a declaration of a firm after closing of the figures, reclassification of investment, transfer of a headquarter to another country.

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"हमारी वेबसाइट आपके ऑनलाइन अनुभव को बेहतर बनाने के लिए कुकीज़ का उपयोग करती है। जब आपने यह वेबसाइट लॉन्च की, तो उन्हें आपके कंप्यूटर पर रखा गया था। आप अपने इंटरनेट ब्राउज़र सेटिंग्स के माध्यम से अपनी व्यक्तिगत कुकी सेटिंग्स बदल सकते हैं।"

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