एक त्रुटि हुई. विवरण छिपाओ
आप के पेज सहेजे नहीं गए है. नवीकरण करें रद्द करें

Democratic Republic of the Congo

  • President:Félix Tshisekedi
  • Prime Minister:Sylvestre Ilunga
  • Capital city:Kinshasa
  • Languages:French (official), Lingala (a lingua franca trade language), Kingwana (a dialect of Kiswahili or Swahili), Kikongo, Tshiluba
  • Government:No data
  • National statistics office:No data
  • Population, persons:8,40,68,091 (2018)
  • Area, sq km:22,67,050
  • GDP per capita, US$:562 (2018)
  • GDP, billion current US$:47.2 (2018)
  • GINI index:No data
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:184

Business

All datasets:  B C E G I K M T W
  • B
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 मार्च, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at: The World Bank https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ Topic: Jobs Publication: https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/jobs License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   The World Bank Jobs Statistics Over 150 indicators on labor-related topics, covering over 200 economies from 1990 to present.
  • C
    • जनवरी 2019
      Source: Transparency International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 फरवरी, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX 2018 by Transparency International is licensed under CC-BY-ND 4.0. Global Corruption Barometer is the largest world-wide public opinion survey on corruption. see more at https://www.transparency.org/cpi2018 Transparency International(TI) defines corruption as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. This definition encompasses corrupt practices in both the public and private sectors. The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranks countries according to the perception of corruption in the public sector. The CPI is an aggregate indicator that combines different sources of information about corruption, making it possible to compare countries. The CPI ranks almost 200 countries by their perceived levels of corruption, as determined by expert assessments and opinion surveys.
    • जून 2017
      Source: African Development Bank Group
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 अगस्त, 2018
      Select Dataset
  • E
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 जुलाई, 2019
      Select Dataset
      1: Most surveys were administered using the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology as outlined in the Methodology page, while some others did not strictly adhere to the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology. For example, for surveys which do not follow the Global Methodology, the Universe under consideration may have consisted of only manufacturing firms or the questionnaire used may have been different from the standard global questionnaire. Data users should exercise caution when comparing raw data and point estimates between surveys that did and did not adhere to the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology. For surveys which did not adhere to the Global Methodology plus Afghanistan 2008, any inference from one of these surveys is representative only for the data sample itself. 2: Regional and "all countries" averages of indicators are computed by taking a simple average of country-level point estimates. For each economy, only the latest available year of survey data is used in this computation. Only surveys, posted during the years 2009-2017, and adhering to the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology are used to compute these regional and "all countries" averages. 3: Descriptions of firm subgroup levels, e.g. how the ex post groupings are constructed, are provided in the Indicator Descriptions (PDF, 710KB) document. 4: Statistics derived from less than or equal to five firms are displayed with an "n.a." to maintain confidentiality and should be distinguished from ".." which indicates missing values. Also note for three growth-related indicators under the "Performance" topic, these indicators are not computed when they are derived from less than 30 firms. 5: Standard errors are labeled "n.c.", meaning not computed, for the following:    1) indicators for all surveys that were not conducted using the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology and    2) for indicator breakdowns by ex post groupings: exporter or ownership type, and gender of the top manager.
  • G
    • दिसम्बर 2013
      Source: Transparency International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 फरवरी, 2014
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at: Global Corruption Barometer (2013) by Transparency International is licensed under CC-BY-ND 4.0 Global Corruption Barometer is the largest world-wide public opinion survey on corruption - See more at: http://www.transparency.org/gcb2013/in_detail#sthash.hey9okGH.dpuf
  • I
    • फरवरी 2019
      Source: Heritage Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 फरवरी, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at: Heritage Foundation   Economic freedom is the fundamental right of every human to control his or her own labor and property. In an economically free society, individuals are free to work, produce, consume, and invest in any way they please, with that freedom both protected by the state and unconstrained by the state. In economically free societies, governments allow labor, capital and goods to move freely, and refrain from coercion or constraint of liberty beyond the extent necessary to protect and maintain liberty itself. Economic Freedom Scores: Range and level of freedom 80–100:- Free 70–79.9:- Mostly Free 60–69.9:- Moderately Free 50–59.9:- Mostly Unfree 0–49.9:- Repressed
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: Property Rights Alliance
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 अक्तूबर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The 2019 IPRI ranks a total of 129 countries from around the world.The selection of countries was determined only by the availability of sufficient data. On average, the complete sample yielded an IPRI score of 5.726. Legal and Political Environment was the weakest component (5.16), followed by Intellectual Property Rights (5.55), while Physical Property Rights was the strongest component (6.47). This year we found a slight decrease of the IPRI score (-0.26%) and of one of its components (LP-1.07%, PPR+0.16% and IPR+0.2%). However, the maximum value of the 2019 IPRI score is higher than in previous years. Finland leads the 2019-IPRI (8.713) as well as the IPR component (8.90), followed by the USA (8.78) in IPR. Switzerland ranks 2nd overall (8.57) followed by New Zealand (8.51) who additionally leads the LP component (8.89). Singapore ranks 4th place overall (8.46) and leads the PPR component (8.71). The following countries continue the overall rankings: Australia, Japan, Sweden, Norway, Luxemburg, Netherlands, Canada, USA, Denmark, Austria and the UK. The group of top 15 countries remains the same with a slightly different order from last year. Note: Only parent indicators present in 2018 report. Other indicators are collected from historical reports.
  • K
  • M
    • मई 2019
      Source: globalEDGE
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 जून, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Global marketing has become more and more important over the years with the increasing trend of internationalization. Faced with too many choices, marketers have the challenge of determining which international markets to enter and the appropriate marketing strategies for those countries. The purpose of this study is to rank, with a U.S. focus, the market potential of the largest economies and to provide guidance to the U.S. companies that plan to expand their markets internationally. While the U.S. is not included in the rankings, the insights provided by the index are still applicable to companies located in other international markets. This indexing study is conducted by the Michigan State University — International Business Center to help companies compare prospect markets on several dimensions. Eight dimensions are chosen to represent the market potential of a country on a scale of 1 to 100. The dimensions are measured using various indicators and are weighted in determining their contribution to the overall Market Potential Index(MPI). Between years 1996 and 2014, the MPI has been calculated for 26 countries identified as "Emerging Markets" by The Economist magazine. However, in order to cover a wider range of markets, a decision has been made in 2014 to increase the number of countries according to the criteria explained below.
  • T
    • मार्च 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 मार्च, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic: The Global Enabling Trade Report 2016 Publication URL: http://reports.weforum.org/global-enabling-trade-report-2016/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode   The Enabling Trade Index (ETI) was developed within the context of the World Economic Forum’s Transportation Industry Partnership program, and was first published in The Global Enabling Trade Report 2008. The ETI measures the extent to which individual economies have developed institutions, policies, and services facilitating the free flow of goods over borders and to destination. The structure of the Index reflects the main enablers of trade, breaking them into four overall issue areas, captured in the subindexes: 1) The market access subindex measures the extent to which the policy framework of the country welcomes foreign goods into the economy and enables access to foreign markets for its exporters. 2) The border administration subindex assesses the extent to which the administration at the border facilitates the entry and exit of goods. 3) Infrastructure subindex takes into account whether the country has in place the transport and communications infrastructure necessary to facilitate the movement of goods within the country and across the border. 4) The business environment subindex looks at the quality of governance as well as at the overarching regulatory and security environment impacting the business of importers and exporters active in the country. Each of these four subindexes is composed in turn of a number of pillars of enabling trade, of which there are seven in all. These are: 1) Domestic market access; 2) Foreign market access; 3) Efficiency and transparency of border administration; 4) Availability and quality of transport infrastructure; 5) Availability and quality of transport services; 6) Availability and use of ICTs; 7) Operating environment. Each indicator and sub-indicator is given a score on a scale of 1 to 7 that corresponds to the worst and best possible outcome, respectively.
  • W
    • सितम्बर 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 अक्तूबर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Note: In recent years, Doing Business introduced improvements to all of its indicator sets. In Doing Business 2015, getting credit and protecting minority investors broadened their existing measures. In Doing Business 2016, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property and enforcing contracts also introduced new measures of quality, and trading across borders introduced a new case scenario to increase the economic relevance. In Doing Business 2017, paying taxes introduced new measures of postfiling processes.
    • अक्तूबर 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 नवम्बर, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The primary World Bank collection of development indicators, compiled from officially-recognized international sources. It presents the most current and accurate global development data available, and includes national, regional and global estimates

हमारी गोपनीयता कथन और कुकी नीति

"हमारी वेबसाइट आपके ऑनलाइन अनुभव को बेहतर बनाने के लिए कुकीज़ का उपयोग करती है। जब आपने यह वेबसाइट लॉन्च की, तो उन्हें आपके कंप्यूटर पर रखा गया था। आप अपने इंटरनेट ब्राउज़र सेटिंग्स के माध्यम से अपनी व्यक्तिगत कुकी सेटिंग्स बदल सकते हैं।"

गोपनीयता नीति