एक त्रुटि हुई. विवरण छिपाओ
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Canada

  • Governor General:Julie Payette
  • Prime Minister:Justin Pierre James Trudeau
  • Capital city:Ottawa
  • Languages:English (official) 58.7%, French (official) 22%, Punjabi 1.4%, Italian 1.3%, Spanish 1.3%, German 1.3%, Cantonese 1.2%, Tagalog 1.2%, Arabic 1.1%, other 10.5% (2011 est.)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:3,70,58,856 (2018)
  • Area, sq km:90,93,510
  • GDP per capita, US$:46,125 (2018)
  • GDP, billion current US$:1,709.3 (2018)
  • GINI index:No data
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:22

Income Distribution

All datasets:  A I P R T W
  • A
    • जून 2013
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Abhilash Devadiga
      Accessed On: 21 नवम्बर, 2014
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      Data cited at: The World Bank https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ Topic: All The Ginis Dataset Publication: https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/all-ginis-dataset License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   This dataset includes combined and standardized Gini data from eight original sources: Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), Socio-Economic Database for Latin America (SEDLAC), Survey of Living Conditions (SILC) by Eurostat, World Income Distribution (WYD; the full data set is available here), World Bank Europe and Central Asia dataset, World Institute for Development Research (WIDER), World Bank Povcal, and Ginis from individual long-term inequality studies (just introduced in this version).
  • I
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 जुलाई, 2019
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      http://www.oecd.org/els/soc/IDD-Metadata.pdf
  • P
    • मार्च 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 अप्रैल, 2019
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      The World Bank periodically prepares poverty assessments of countries in which it has an active program, in close collaboration with national institutions, other development agencies, and civil society, including poor people's organizations. Assessments report the extent and causes of poverty and propose strategies to reduce it. Countries have varying definitions of poverty, and comparisons can be difficult. National poverty lines tend to have higher purchasing power in rich countries, where standards used are more generous than in poor countries. Poverty measures based on an international poverty line attempt to hold the real value of the poverty line constant across countries, including when making comparisons over time. Data here includes measures of population living below the national poverty line as well as the international poverty line. Also included are income distributions and urban and rural poverty
  • R
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 जुलाई, 2019
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      The Regional well-being dataset presents eleven dimensions central for well-being at local level and for 395 OECD regions, covering material conditions (income, jobs and housing), quality of life (education, health, environment, safety and access to services) and subjective well-being (social network support and life satisfaction). The set of indicators selected to measure these dimensions is a combination of people's individual attributes and their local conditions, and in most cases, are available over two different years (2000 and 2014). Regions can be easily visualised and compared to other regions through the interactive website [www.oecdregionalwellbeing.org]. The dataset, the website and the publications "Regions at a Glance" and "How’s life in your region?" are outputs designed from the framework for regional and local well-being. The Regional income distribution dataset presents comparable data on sub-national differences in income inequality and poverty for OECD countries. The data by region provide information on income distribution within regions (Gini coefficients and income quintiles), and relative income poverty (with poverty thresholds set in respect of the national population) for 2013. These new data complement international assessments of differences across regions in living conditions by documenting how household income is distributed within regions and how many people are poor relatively to the typical citizen of their country. For analytical purposes, the OECD classifies regions as the first administrative tier of sub-national government, so called Territorial Level 2 or TL2 in the OECD classification. This classification is used by National Statistical Offices to collect information and it represents in many countries the framework for implementing regional policies. Well-being indicators are shown for the 395 TL2 OECD regions, equivalent of the NUTS2 for European countries, with the exception for Estonian where well-being data are presented at a smaller (TL3) level and for the Regional Income dataset, where Greece, Hungary and Poland data are presented at a more aggregated (NUTS1) level.
  • T
  • W
    • जुलाई 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 जुलाई, 2019
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      While much of the comparative evidence on inequalities that is currently available refers to household income, wealth is a critical dimension of households’ economic well-being. How wealth is distributed is important for equity and inter-generational mobility, but also for the stability of the economic system and for its resilience to shocks. While the lack of comparative evidence in this field reflects the absence of an agreed standard that statistical offices could use when collecting this information, this gap has been addressed by the OECD with the release in 2013 of a set of statistical guidelines in this field. In 2013, the OECD issued a set of ‘Guidelines’ for micro statistics on household wealth (OECD, 2013) and an increasing number of countries have engaged in the collection of micro statistics in this field (European Central Bank, 2013). Building on these initiatives as well as others, such as the Luxembourg Wealth Study (Sierminska et al, 2006) which have informed previous OECD analysis (Jantii et al., 2008), the OECD has now collected a new set of data on the distribution of household wealth for 18 OECD countries, based on the set of conventions and classifications proposed in the 2013 OECD Guidelines.

हमारी गोपनीयता कथन और कुकी नीति

"हमारी वेबसाइट आपके ऑनलाइन अनुभव को बेहतर बनाने के लिए कुकीज़ का उपयोग करती है। जब आपने यह वेबसाइट लॉन्च की, तो उन्हें आपके कंप्यूटर पर रखा गया था। आप अपने इंटरनेट ब्राउज़र सेटिंग्स के माध्यम से अपनी व्यक्तिगत कुकी सेटिंग्स बदल सकते हैं।"

गोपनीयता नीति