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The PEW Charitable Trusts

The Pew Charitable Trusts, an independent nonprofit, is the sole beneficiary of seven individual charitable funds established between 1948 and 1979 by two sons and two daughters of Sun Oil Company founder Joseph Newton Pew and his wife, Mary Anderson Pew. Honoring their parents’ religious conviction that good works should be done quietly, the original Pew Memorial Foundation was a grant making organization that made donations anonymously. Today The Pew Charitable Trusts is a global non-governmental organization with three broad goals: • Improve public policy by conducting rigorous analysis, linking diverse interests to pursue common cause and insisting on tangible results; • Inform the public by providing useful data that illuminate the issues and trends shaping our world; • Invigorate civic life by encouraging democratic participation and strong communities. In our hometown of Philadelphia, we support organizations that create a thriving arts and culture community and institutions that enhance the well-being of the region’s neediest citizens.

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    • मई 2016
      Source: The PEW Charitable Trusts
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 अप्रैल, 2017
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      Debt and state personal income are based on calendar years; pension and retiree health care data are based on states’ own fiscal years. Retiree health care data are reported since 2010 because states only began publishing the plans’ unfunded obligations in 2008, and states were still adjusting to the new reporting standards in the first two years. Pension data are reported since 2003 because it is the first year for which Pew collected data. The size of a state’s liability is expressed as a percentage of personal income. But when expressing how much a state’s liability has changed, such as between 2003 and 2013, the difference between those percentages is measured in percentage points, not percent. Dollar values are rounded to the nearest thousand. Obligations as a share of state personal income are rounded to the nearest tenth of a percent. Obligations as a share of personal income may not always sum due to rounding.
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    • अगस्त 2017
      Source: The PEW Charitable Trusts
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 दिसम्बर, 2017
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      Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis Data for fiscal years 2000-15 are the final figures reported by state budget officials in fall surveys conducted by the National Association of State Budget Officers (NASBO) between August and October each year. “Actual” results for fiscal 2016 and “estimated” results for fiscal 2017 are based on spring surveys returned between February and April 2017. Fiscal 2016 and 2017 data will be restated in subsequent NASBO reports, with fiscal 2017 figures highly likely to change. Arkansas has reported zero rainy day funds in each survey since 2000. As a result, the state is classified as “none reported” and is recorded as zero for the calculation of the 50-state median. Kansas and Montana report zero for rainy day funds in each survey since 2000. This is because neither state had a rainy day fund at the time of the survey. In both cases they are classified as “no rainy day fund” and recorded as zero for the calculation of the 50-state median. Georgia and Oklahoma did not report a rainy day fund balance for fiscal 2017 because their figures had not been finalized in time for the survey. So they are also classified as “none reported” and recorded as zero for the calculation of the 50-state median. Oregon did not report rainy day fund balances before fiscal 2008. As a result, the state is classified as “none reported” for fiscal 2000-07 and recorded as zero for the calculation of the 50-state median. Beginning in fiscal 2008, the balances reflect figures reported by the state to NASBO. Wisconsin did not report rainy day fund balances before fiscal 2014. As a result, the state is classified as “none reported” for fiscal 2000-13 and recorded as zero for the calculation of the 50-state median. Beginning in fiscal 2014, the balances reflect figures reported by the state to NASBO. Wyoming changed its rainy day fund reporting practices for the fall 2016 survey. Before 2015, the state reported a reduced portion of its reserve holdings because it uses biennial budgeting. Starting in fiscal 2015, the state revised its reporting to reflect the full rainy day fund balance. Comparisons of Wyoming’s 2016 rainy day fund and total balances against prior years should be made with caution. Data are reported by each state for its fiscal year, which ends June 30 in all but four states: New York (March 31), Texas (Aug. 31), and Alabama and Michigan (both Sept. 30). See NASBO’s “The Fiscal Survey of States” reports for additional notes.